Accounting for Managers (ACFI5020)

Assignment 2011/2012

 

Shareholders and lenders, whilst not being the only stakeholders, provide capital to companies because they seek a return commensurate with the level of risk that they are willing to take.

It is within this context that the price of BMW Group’s ordinary shares have experienced a mixed performance over recent years.  The last five year’s share price performance can be seen on the graph below:

 

 

As can be seen from the graph above the company has performed well since the end of 2009 when it began to recover from the effects of the global recession. Albeit the company, along with many others has suffered from very recent excessive stock market volatility.

The share price performance of the BMW Group (quoted in Germany) can be seen to be particularly impressive if compared with the performance of the FTSE100 companies quoted in the UK since the end of 2010. This can be seen in the graph below (BMW is the more volatile line):

 

 

 

It should also be noted that the performance of the BMW group is very similar if compared to the performance of the US economy via the S & P 500 Index.

The confidence in BMW’s recent performance can also be seen in the following articles from the Financial Times:

BMW claims profits safe from downturn

Bryant, Chris. Financial Times [London (UK)] 10 Sep 2011: 10.  

BMW says it would not make a loss if the auto sector experienced a repeat of the 2008-09 crisis, underscoring the confidence of German carmakers in the sustainability of strong demand for premium vehicles in emerging markets. 

Friedrich Eichiner, BMW’s chief financial officer, said that in spite of recent turmoil in financial markets the carmaker did not foresee a double-dip recession, rather only a slowing of growth in some economies. 

Nevertheless, he said BMW was much better prepared than in 2008 having implemented restructuring measures, rebalanced its car finance portfolio and increased production flexibility. 

“Because of these structural changes we’ve carried out, if the same crisis came that we had in 2008, we wouldn’t make a loss,” Mr Eichiner told reporters. 

After experiencing a savage downturn in 2008-09, global carmakers are on high alert for any sign that consumers are deferring expensive purchases as a result of recent volatility in the markets. 

The topic of a potential downturn is set to overshadow next week’s Frankfurt motor show, a biennial opportunity for the industry to show off its wares. 

But BMW said its checks – which include monitoring how many people are coming into showrooms – had revealed no sudden drop in buyers’ interest. 

Rather, customers of BMW – maker of BMW, Mini and Rolls-Royce cars – continue to endure long waiting times for some popular models such as the X3 compact SUV. Meanwhile, the company’s production lines are running at full capacity. 

Total car sales at BMW increased by 7.4 per cent in August compared with the previous year and the company reiterated its goal to achieve more than 1.6m vehicle sales in 2011, the highest among German premium carmakers. 

BMW, Mercedes-Benz and Audi are enjoying near unprecedented demand in emerging markets, particularly China, as newly wealthy and brand conscious consumers show a preference for expensive, German-made vehicles. 

This has helped carmakers build up large cash piles and propelled profit margins to exceptional levels. 

“Thanks to Chinese profits, other growth markets and the structural cost actions taken in 2008-09, we think it’s quite likely that the German premium brands could stay profitable and at least cash neutral in a mild recession scenario,” Max Warburton, at Bernstein Research, told clients in a recent note. 

China accounted for 14.5 per cent of BMW’s sales in the first half of the year, compared with almost 20 per cent in North America and 17 per cent in Germany. 

 

It is also possible to see a great deal of background information on the BMW group at:

(http://bmwgroup.com/e/nav/index.html?../0_0_www_bmwgroup_com/home/home.html&source=overview)

 

You are required to do as follows:


Task One

Using the Annual Report and Accounts of BMW AG for the year ended 31st December 2010

(available at http://annual-report.bmwgroup.com/2010/gb/files/pdf/en/BMW_Group_AR2010.pdf):

You should:

  • Evaluate the performance of BMW in the following areas, using ratio analysis:

 

  • Profitability
  • Liquidity/Solvency
  • Working capital efficiency
  • Long term financial structure
  • Investors’ perspective

 

You may also use earlier years’ financial accounts to supplement your analysis if you wish to be specific with certain trends that you have identified.

In addition you could also consider the performance of BMW in comparison with its peer group of competitors.

You should summarise your findings and make particular reference to the interests of the different stakeholders of the company.

Note: Any accounting ratios for BMW must be calculated (and workings shown) and not extracted from external databases, although, further analysis may be supported by downloading ratios from external databases for competitor companies. 

(40%)

(10% will be awarded with regard to the relevance and accuracy of the ratios and 30% will be rewarded according to the quality of your written analysis)


Task Two

In 2002 SAP Ag reported the success of the BMW Group’s application of ‘Just In Time’ (JIT) practices, enabling the compression of customer order cycles and improved accuracy with regards to inventory. Yet that same year, Automotive News (2002, 25th March) reported that BMW had moved beyond the JIT production and adopted a more ‘customer order’ focussed global system. 

As one of the leading European automotive manufacturers, critically discuss the philosophies and approaches of JIT practice and their applicability, or not, in today’s turbulent global environment for BMW?

Appropriate credible academic and practitioner literature sources must be used to support your critical analysis, and the Harvard style of referencing must be adopted.

(50%)

Task Three

Considering your responses to Tasks One and Two you are required to provide advice, accompanied by rationale, as to whether you would recommend a buy, sell or hold (if they are already owned) policy for investors/potential investors in BMW shares.

(10%)

(Total 100%)

Further Information:

You are required to present well structured answers of no more than 3,000 words (excluding calculations) in total.   The words should be allotted according to the percentage marks awarded for each task.

Learning Outcomes specifically assessed:

Subject Specific Knowledge and Skills

  1. Identify and critically appraise the different components of a financial report, and assess the adequacy of current international financial reporting requirements for a greater understanding of company performance
  2. Analyse and interpret financial data and information, evaluate their relevance and validity, and synthesise a range of information in the context of business situations
  3. Demonstrate the ability to use conventional management accounting and financial management techniques to produce appropriate information for management to aid  planning, control and decision making
  4. Evaluate the usefulness of contemporary management accounting techniques in measuring business performance 
  5. Critically appraise management accounting techniques with respect to their effectiveness and identify any weaknesses inherent in their use

 

Non Subject Specific and Cognitive Skills 

  1. Manage own learning, using the available range of resources, and ability to conduct research into business and management issues
  2. Ability to collect relevant information relating to a given situation, analyse that information and synthesise it into an appropriate form in order to evaluate decision alternatives
  3. Demonstrate a practical and integrative approach to a problem area or issue
  4. Demonstrate rigour of academic arguments as well as the application of theory

 

Assignments will be graded according to the general postgraduate assessment criteria and you should also bear the following in mind:

  • Evidence of critical judgement in selecting, ordering and analysing content in order to present a sound argument
  • The demonstration and understanding of relevant concepts and models
  • The demonstration of insight and originality in responding to the assignment
  • The provision of well-referenced evidence

 

Students are required to achieve an average of 50% overall in order to pass this module. 

All of the usual University regulations will apply with regard to the late submission of work and plagiarism.

Hand in date: 16th January 2012

First Markers

Task One  – Phil Wilson

Task Two – Alexandra Charles

Task Three – Phil Wilson

 

 

1.0 Introduction 

 

This essay is mainly to evaluate the performance of BMW and to assess the applicability of just-in-time (JIT) practice for BMW. The performance of BMW is about to be evaluated in five basic areas as profitability, liquidity, working capital efficiency, long term financial structure and investors’ perspective. In order to represent BMW’s competitiveness and its market position more clearly, the performance comparison with its peer group of competitors’ performance is involved. What’s more, the interests of BMW’s different stakeholders are also analyzed and discussed, so as to recommend rational and reliable investment advice to the stakeholders. For the assessment of the applicability of JIT for BMW, it is separated into the theoretic and practical aspects. In theoretic aspect, with the objective to give to comparatively completed picture of JIT in BMW, JIT’s philosophies and approaches are introduced and the potential advantages and disadvantages of JIT for a company are discussed. In practical aspect, the performance of BMW connected with JIT’s application is checked so as to evaluate the applicability of JIT for BMW. At the end of this essay, it tries to recommend some rational investment advice to investors on the basis of the achieved findings and conclusions.

 

With the objectives mentioned above, this essay is constructed in four basic parts. The first part is the introduction which involves the main objectives and basic structure of the essay. The second one is to evaluate the performance of BMW with appropriate financial information. The third part aims to discuss the applicability of JIT for BMW and the last one is to summarize the main viewpoints and findings achieved in the essay and to recommend appropriate investment advice to the investors. 

 

2.0 Performance Evaluation of BMW

 

This section is mainly going to evaluate the performance of BMW. In order to do that, the financial ratio analysis method is applied and the performance comparison with its matching component is made. At the same time, the interests of BMW’s different stakeholders are concerned and analyzed during the evaluation process. The section involves two main parts. Firstly, it describes the main ratios and the data used in this section, and secondly it interprets these ratios and discusses the involved interests. 

 

2.1 Description of Ratios and Data

 

As required in task one, this section is going to evaluate the performance of BMW in five basic areas as profitability, liquidity, working capital efficiency, long term financial structure and investors’ perspective. Each area is measured by several widely used ratios or indexes whose calculation expressions are specified in Table 1. In order to make the evaluation easier to understand, the performance of BMW Group is compared with that of Daimler Group, which is its matching component almost in every aspect like size, quality and reputation. The data is from BMW and Daimler annual report during 2008 and 2010 (Atrill etc., 2008). 

 

2.2 Interpretation of Ratios and Indexes and Discussion of Relevant Interests

 

Please refer to table 1, the profitability is measured by the four ratios as net profit margin, gross profit margin, return on assets and return on equity, and the higher the four ratios, the stronger the profitability. During 2008 and 2010, the net profit margins for BMW were 2.41%, 2.82% and 9.59%, and compared with 2.85%, -1.92% and 7.44% for Daimler respectively, they were higher on average, which means the net profitability of BMW during the last few years was stronger than Daimler. The gross profit margins for BMW were 16.68%, 10.51% and 18.05%, and compared with 22.49%, 16.92% and 23.29%, they were lower on average, which means the gross profitability of BMW was weaker than that of Daimler during that period. Put the net profit margins and gross profit margins in thought together, it could conclude that the cost of sales of BMW was higher than that of Daimler which was possibly caused by application of JIT which would be explained below, while the operation was more efficient than that in Daimler. In addition with the return on assets and return on equity both more stable and a higher than these of Daimler, it could be concluded that the profitability of BMW is stronger, and all involved interests could get more protection in BMW (Horngen etc., 2002). From the trend of the four ratios in the last three years, it is expecting that the profitability of BMW would become increasingly stronger in the near future. 

 

The liquidity is measured by current ratio and acid test, which represents the ability of a company to meet its short-term financial obligations, and the higher the ratios, the stronger the ability, the safer the short-term debtors. From table 1, It can be seen that the current ratios of BMW were 98.43%, 108.19% and 107.52%, and they were lower than those of Daimler on average, which means the ability of short-term financing was not as strong as that of Daimler during the period from 2008 to 2010. While from the results of acid test, which is a more stringent test of liquidity, it can be discovered that the results of acid test were higher than these of Daimler. Put the results of current ratio and acid test together, it might conclude that BMW had fewer inventories than Daimler during that period (Horngen etc., 2002). From the results of liquidity test, both short-term debtors were protected well in both companies and this kind of protection will not be weakened in the several coming years. 

 

The working capital efficiency is measured by five basic ratios and indexes as assets turnover ratio, inventory turnover ratio, inventory turnover days, debtors’ turnover days and creditors’ turnover days. Assets turnover ratio measures the efficiency of total assets running, and the higher the ratio, the more effective the total assets management. From table 1, it can be seen the total assets management of BMW was not as effective as that of Daimler. Inventory turnover ratio and inventory turnover days both represent the efficiency of inventory management. From table 1, BMW had the inventory turnover ratios of 605.55%, 655.20% and 692.16% and the inventory turnover days of 59, 54 and 51. Compared with these of Daimler, it can be found that the inventory management efficiency was much higher than that of Daimler, and the possible reason was the application of JIT in BMW which would be explained below. The debtors’ turnover days measures the efficiency to receive back the trade receivables and the creditors’ turnover days the efficiency to pay back the trade payables (Horngen etc., 2002). That both indexes were shorter than that of Daimler means the efficiency of liquid capital was more efficient in BMW, thus the interests of creditors and BMW itself were protected better. Based on the discussion above, the working capital efficiency of BMW was better on average, and it is reasonable to expect the advantages to be held in the near future. 

 

The long-term financial structure is measured by total debt-to-assets ratio and interest coverage ratio (Horngen etc., 2002), and from table 1, the total debt-to-assets ratio of BMW were little higher than that of Daimler and BMW undertook heavier interest expenses, while the interest coverage ratio of BMW were much higher than that of Daimler with 137.74%, 140.73%, 600.62% to 91.30%, -78.76%, 494.49% respectively. It means the interests of long-term debtors were protected much better during the period and the trend seems to continue. 

 

The investors’ perspective is assessed by dividend yield, EPS, P/E ratio and dividend payout ratio. Dividend yield ratio assesses the cash return on the investment, EPS ratio measures the earnings available to shareholders, P/E ratio relates to the market confidence in the future of the company and dividend payout ratio measures the proportion of earnings that a company pays to its shareholders in the form of dividends (Horngen etc., 2002). Compared Daimler Group, the ratios and indexes of BMW were all more stable and better, which means the interests of shareholders were concerned more and protected safer. 

 

2.3 Conclusion

 

To sum up, by assessing the performance in five basic areas as profitability, liquidity, working capital efficiency, long term financial structure and investors’ perspective, it can be rationally concluded that BMW was run better than Daimler on average, and the trend is expecting to continue. 

 

3.0 Applicability Analysis of JIT for BMW

 

This section mainly aims to states the philosophies and approaches of JIT practice and to discuss the potential advantages and disadvantages that JIT might bring to BMW. Considering that JIT practices were applied by BMW Group in 2002 and were shifted to a more “customer order” focused global system in the same year, the discuss of advantages and disadvantages of JIT in BMW would be difficult to make for lacking of enough relevant information. However, the viewpoints in this essay would still be argued by using the existing information, because the later adopted “customer order” focused global system is built on the basis of JIT and its theories are similar with JIT’s, the information produced during the application period of later system would be useful for the arguments in the essay to some extent. 

 

With the aims mentioned above, the rest part of this section is constructed in three basic parts. The first part is to introduce the philosophies and approaches of JIT practice in theory. The second part is to discuss the potential advantages and disadvantages of JIT and their respectively appropriate evidences in BMW, and the last part is to summarize the main viewpoints and findings achieved in the section.

 

3.1 Philosophies and Approaches of JIT in Theory

 

JIT is a strategy of the management between production, suppliers and marketing with the aim to minimize or diminish the amount of inventory to the point where it is capable to satisfy the demands required in production or sales. In JIT, the production is triggered by customers’ demands and the raw materials for the production are supplied precisely only when they are required. Thus, the goal of JIT is to (1) meet the demands of customers in a timely manner (2) with well-designed and high quality products (3) and at the lowest possible costs. For short, the philosophy of JIT is to eliminate waste and to strive for excellence (Fabozzi etc., 2003).

 

For the success of JIT practices, it is very important for the manufacture to inform its suppliers the inventories requirements in advance and for the suppliers to deliver the materials of the right quantity and quality to the manufacture at the agreed times in their return. The failure to do so could lead to the delay of production or disappointment of customers which could be very costly (Kieso etc., 2009). Thus a close and reliable relationship between the business and its suppliers is very required in JIT. 

 

Besides that, there are some other approaches of JIT worthy being mentioned. For example, an effective purchase-order system has to be estimated between business and suppliers. Workers have to be trained with multi-skills and to be capable of performing various tasks and operations, including routine equipment maintenance and minor repairs. Delay in each component in a production line has to be aggressively eliminated, and the setup time to get equipment, materials and tools ready to start the production has to be reduced (Weygandt etc., 2009). 

 

3.2 Potential Advantages and Disadvantages of JIT and Appropriate Evidence in BMW

 

The application of JIT would bring some potential benefits and costs to a company, and the amount of the benefit and cost would largely depend on the effectiveness of the applicability for the company. The potential benefits and costs of JIT and its applicability for BMW would be discussed in the rest part of this section. 

 

Potential Advantages of JIT 

 

As stated in many literatures, the successful application of JIT is expecting to bring several benefits for the company, and three basic ones are listed below. The first one is to effectively reduce the amount of inventory because the materials required in the production or sales would be supplied in a timely manner. The second one is to improve the production efficiency by reducing waiting time during the production assembly line with the help of the purchase-order system between business and suppliers. The third one is to improve the accuracy of finished products for they are demanded by customers in advance and produced according to customers’ requirements (Elliott etc., 2011). 

 

Potential Disadvantages of JIT

 

Though JIT allows a company to hold inventory as few as possible, some other costs may be associated with this approach. As the suppliers have to hold the inventories for the production or sales, they might try to recoup the additional costs through the increased prices. The requirement for suppliers to deliver the right amount of materials to the business timely would prevent the company from taking advantage of cheaper purchase. At the same time, few inventories prepared for the business and the failure to supply them on time would increase the company’s operating risks (Elliott etc., 2011). 

 

Practical Evidence in BMW

 

As stated in BMW Group annual report 2003, an integrated logistics center has been established at the plant to ensure the various production areas to be supplied flexibly, efficiently and reliably with components and parts, and JIT ensures suppliers to deliver large components such as seats and cockpit directly to the assembly line.

 

As financial report is consolidated information, the potential benefits and costs mentioned above should be reflected in some financial information as long as they exist in the company. Because of its potential advantages, it is expecting that JIT would increase the inventory turnover ratio and the underlying profit ratio and decrease the ratio of administration costs to sales, while the ratio of costs to sales is looking upward for its disadvantages. Inventory turnover ratio equals the production costs relevant to sales achieved divided by the average holding inventory. The underlying profit measures the gross operating profit directly related to the production with sales minus relevant production costs, the administrative costs and the marketing costs. These ratios for BMW Group have been represented in the essay and please refer to table 2 and chart 1.

 

From the table 2 and chart 1, it can be seen that since the application of JIT in 2002, the four ratios have not run as exactly as the theory predicts. Except that the ratio of costs to sales has slightly increased, other ratios have not shown the stable compliance for the theory. For example, the inventory ratio has not impressively increased but slightly decreased, the ratio of administration costs to sales has not remarkable decreased or the underlying profit ratio has not shown significant upward. In spite of the facts, the four ratios have stayed relatively stable until the financial crisis happened in 2008. All these outcomes represent that the potential benefits of JIT have not been fully explored or reflected at least in economic aspect, while the positive aspect is that the operating risks have not increased as much as the theory predicts which means the relationship between BMW Group and its suppliers is close and stable. Another possible explanation for the outcomes is that the system applied by BMW Group before 2002 had been so effective that the JIT could not make any significant improvement to the business.

 

In order to express the benefits and costs of JIT with powerful proves, the comparison of these ratios between BMW Group and Daimler Group is necessary. Please refer to table 3 and chart 2-5. Chart 2 states the comparison of inventory turnover ratios between BMW and Daimler, and it shows that the ratios of BMW were stably higher than that of Daimler, which means that the efficiency of inventory management and usage was much better. Chart 3 represents the difference of ratios of administration costs to sales between BMW and Daimler, from which it can be seen that the ratios of BMW were much lower as predicted above. Chart 4 relates the comparison of underlying profit ratios between BMW and Daimler, which shows that both the ratios of BMW and Daimler were fluctuated and similar. Chart 5 measures the difference of ratios of costs to sales, and the results shows that the ratios of BMW were stably higher as predicted, too. Put the four ratios in thought together, and three of them went as the theory of JIT predicted, thus it would lead to a comparatively reliable argument of this essay that compared with other companies without using JIT, the application of JIT helped the BMW to improve its inventory management efficiency and reduce some related costs. 

 

3.3 Conclusion

 

To sum up, by assessing some relevant financial information of BMW Group, it shows that the financial information does not fully support the JIT predictions. One possible reason is the potential benefits of JIT maybe have not been fully explored in economic aspect, and another possible one is that the system applied by BMW Group before 2002 had been so effective that the JIT could not make any significant improvement to the business. However, by comparing the same ratios of BMW with these of Daimler, it can be found that these ratios run almost as the JIT theory predicted. Based on the findings, it can be reasonably concluded that BMW had not largely improved its inventory management and its production efficiency, but had helped BMW to keep its inventory management advantages over other components during the pasted years. 

 

4.0 Recommendation

 

Investment decision is made based on forward expectation of operation and profitability of a company for the actual future realization is not available, and the forward expectation is proved widely to be relevant to the realized condition and situation closely. According to the assessment and analysis of the realized condition and situation of BMW made above, it is recommended to buy in BMW shares in the essay for three basic reasons as below. 

 

The first one is its better performance in the previous period. According to the assessment above, it is concluded that BMW Group performed better than Daimler in the aspects of profitability, liquidity, working capital efficiency and long-term structure on average, and the interests of the different stakeholders in BMW were better protected. At the same time, this essay finds that the application of JIT had helped BMW to keep its inventory management advantages over other components during the pasted years. The second one is the stability of the operation and financial performance in BMW. From the comparison of the ratios with Daimler and the financial analysis in chart 1, it can be seen that financial performance, inventory management, total assets operation and other indexes are comparatively stable, and the better stability would guarantee its continuances of the better performance (Scott, 1997). The third reason is the preferential macro-economic environment. Since 2010, BMW has enjoyed enormous increase in sales in China Market, and China market also has shown a great potential in the future. At the same time, other areas begin to recover from the 2008 financial crisis and show an increase trend in the demand for BMW’s cars. All these potential demands would increase the sales and the profits of BMW directly and increase the investors’ interests indirectly. 

 

To sum up, the previous better performance, its better stability and the preferential macro-economic environment would ensure the interests of investors to be protected more safely and to be increased more possibly, thus the recommendation of buying in BMW’s shares is made in this essay. 

 

 

Appendixes:

Table 1: Evaluation of the Performance of BMW Group and Benz Group

In Euro Million

   

BMW Group

Daimler Group

Year

 

2008

2009

2010

2008

2009

2010

Inventories

 

7,290

6,555

7,766

16,244

12,845

14,544

Trade receivable

 

2,305

1,857

2,329

6,999

5,285

7,192

Current assets

 

38,670

39,944

43,151

55,389

54,280

57,003

Trade payable

 

2,562

3,122

4,351

6,478

5,622

7,657

Current liabilities

 

39,287

36,919

40,134

52,182

47,538

53,139

Total liabilities

 

80,543

82,038

85,767

99,495

96,994

97,877

Total assets

 

101,086

101,953

108,867

132,219

128,821

135,830

Equity

 

20,273

19,915

23,100

32,724

31,827

37,953

Revenues

 

53,197

50,681

60,477

95,873

78,924

97,761

Cost of sales

 

44,323

45,356

49,562

74,314

65,567

74,988

Gross profit

 

8,874

5,325

10,915

21,559

13,357

22,773

selling expense

 

     

9,204

7,608

8,861

general administrative costs

 

     

4,124

3,287

3,474

Sales and administrative costs

 

5,369

5,040

5,529

13,328

10,895

12,335

Other operating income

 

1,428

808

766

 

693

971

Other operating expenses

 

1,187

804

1,058

 

503

660

other operating net income

 

     

780

   

Interest and similar expenses

 

930

1,014

966

2,990

1,921

1,471

Profit / loss before tax

 

351

413

4,836

2,895

-2,298

6,628

Net profit / loss

 

330

210

3,234

1,414

-2,644

4,674

Net profit before interest and taxation

 

1,281

1,427

5,802

2,730

-1,513

7,274

Dividend per share

 

0.30

0.30

1.30

0.6

0

1.85

market value of shares

 

21.61

31.80

58.85

26.7

37.23

50.73

Profitability

Net profit margin

Net profit before interest and taxation/Revenues

2.41%

2.82%

9.59%

2.85%

-1.92%

7.44%

Gross profit margin

Gross profit/Revenues

16.68%

10.51%

18.05%

22.49%

16.92%

23.29%

Return on assets

Net profit before interest and taxation/Total assets

1.27%

1.40%

5.33%

2.06%

-1.17%

5.36%

Return on equity

Net profit before interest and taxation/Equity

6.32%

7.17%

25.12%

8.34%

-4.75%

19.17%

Liquidity

Current ratio

current assets/current liabilities

98.43%

108.19%

107.52%

106.15%

114.18%

107.27%

Acid test

current assets minus inventories/current liabilities

79.87%

90.44%

88.17%

75.02%

87.16%

79.90%

Working capital efficiency

Assets turnover ratio

Revenues/Average total assets

55.97%

49.92%

57.37%

71.73%

60.47%

73.88%

Inventory turnover ratio

Cost of sales/Average inventories

605.55%

655.20%

692.16%

497.95%

450.80%

547.58%

Inventory turnover days

=365/Inventory turnover ratio

59

54

51

71

79

65

Debots turnover days

=365*Trade Receivable/Revenues

16

13

14

27

24

27

Creditors turnover days

=365*Trade payable/Cost of sales

21

25

32

32

31

37

Long term financial structure

Total debt-to-assets ratio

Total liabilities/Total assets

79.68%

80.47%

78.78%

75.25%

75.29%

72.06%

Interest coverage ratio

Net profit before interest and taxation/Interest expense

137.74%

140.73%

600.62%

91.30%

-78.76%

494.49%

Investors’ perspective

Dividend yield

Dividend per share/market value of shares

1.39%

0.94%

2.21%

2.25%

0.00%

3.65%

EPS

Earnings per share of common stock

0.49

0.31

4.91

1.41

-2.63

4.28

P/E ratio

market value of shares/EPS

44.10

102.58

11.99

18.94

-14.16

11.85

dividend payout ratio

Dividend per share/EPS

61.22%

96.77%

26.48%

42.55%

0.00%

43.22%

 

Table 2: Financial Ratios of BMW for JIT Applicability                            

In Euro Million

Index

Numbers

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Inventories

(1)

3,621

2,634

4,501

5,197

5,693

6,467

6,527

6,794

7,349

7,290

6,555

7,766

Sales

(2)

34,402

37,226

38,463

42,411

41,525

44,335

46,656

48,999

56,018

53,197

50,681

60,477

Cost of sales

(3)

28,757

28,747

28,727

32,754

32,090

34,064

35,992

37,660

43,832

44,323

45,356

49,562

General administration costs

(4)

495

351

373

738

775

876

904

917

881

1,366

1,379

1,345

Sales and marketing costs

(5)

4,203

1,619

1,974

2,168

2,247

2,685

2,734

2,560

2,786

3,085

3,105

2,783

Underlying profit 
((2)-(3)-(4)-(5))

(6)

947

6,509

7,389

6,751

6,413

6,710

7,026

7,862

8,519

4,423

841

6,787

Inventory turnover ratio 

(7)

7.73

9.19

8.05

6.75

5.89

5.60

5.54

5.65

6.20

6.06

6.55

6.92

Ratio of administration costs to sales (%) 

(8)

1.44

0.94

0.97

1.74

1.87

1.98

1.94

1.87

1.57

2.57

2.72

2.22

Underlying profit ratio (%)
((6)/(2)*100)

(9)

2.75

17.49

19.21

15.92

15.44

15.13

15.06

16.05

15.21

8.31

1.66

11.22

Ratio of costs to sales
((3)/(2)*100)

(10)

83.59

77.22

74.69

77.23

77.28

76.83

77.14

76.86

78.25

83.32

89.49

81.95

 

Chart 1: Financial Ratios of BMW for JIT Applicability

 

Table 3: Comparison Between BMW and Daimler for JIT Applicability

In Euro Million

 

 

BMW

Daimler

 

numbers

2008

2009

2010

2008

2009

2010

Inventories

(1)

7,290

6,555

7,766

16244

12845

14544

Sales

(2)

53,197

50,681

60,477

95873

78924

97761

Cost of sales

(3)

44,323

45,356

49,562

74314

65567

74988

General administration costs

(4)

1,366

1,379

1,345

4124

3287

3474

Sales and marketing costs

(5)

3,085

3,105

2,783

9204

7608

8861

Underlying profit 
((2)-(3)-(4)-(5))

(6)

4,423

841

6,787

8,231

2,462

10,438

Inventory turnover ratio 

(7)

6.06

6.55

6.92

4.98

4.51

5.48

Ratio of administration costs to sales (%) 

(8)

2.57

2.72

2.22

4.30

4.16

3.55

Underlying profit ratio (%)
((6)/(2)*100)

(9)

8.31

1.66

11.22

8.59

3.12

10.68

Ratio of costs to sales
((3)/(2)*100)

(10)

83.32

89.49

81.95

77.51

83.08

76.71

 

 

 

 

References: 

 

Atrill, P. & McLaney, E. (2008). Accounting and Finance for Non-Specialists. 6th edition. London: Prentice Hall Financial Times.

 

Horngen, Charles T., Datar, Srikant M. & Rajan, Madhav V. (2002). Cost Accounting: A Managerial Emphasis. 14th edition. New Jersey: Pearson Hall.

 

Fabozzi, Frank J. & Peterson, Pamela P. (2003). Financial Management and Analysis. 2nd edition. Ontario: John Wiley & Sons Canada, Ltd.

 

Kieso, Donald E., Weygandt, Jerry J. & Warfield, Terry D. (2009). Intermediate Accounting. 14th edition. USA: John Wiley & Sons.

 

Weygandt, Jerry J., Kimmel, Paul D., Kieso, Donald E. & Aly, Ibrahim M. (2009). Managerial Accounting: Tools for Business Decision-Making. 2nd Canadian edition. Ontario: John Wiley & Sons Canada, Ltd.

 

Elliott, Barry & Elliott, Jamie (2011). Financial Accounting and Reporting. 14th edition. London: Pearson Education.

 

Scott, William R. (1997). Financial Accounting Theory. 4th edition. Toronto: Prentice Hall 

 

BMW Group Annual Report (1999-2010)

 

Daimler Group Annual Report (2008-2010)

原文链接:Accounting for Managers