PART ONE: COVER PAGE

 

De Montfort University

 

 

Module Title: Critical Perspectives in Global Management 

 

Assignment Title: Personal Reflective Journal

 

PART TWO: INDIVIDUAL CASE REFLECTION

 

Case One: Apple

Question 1: What is the case study about? 

This case study is about Steve Jobs and its Apple Company. The main argument of the case study is that Job’s attitude towards business is ‘regular rules do not apply’. That is, the business style of Apple and the personality of Jobs are both quite different from other famous tech firms in Silicon Valley. For instance, Jobs is a micromanager and no products can be published without meeting his exacting standards. In addition, the Apple Company operates with a level of secrecy, even its own employees often have no idea what their own company is up to. However, this kind of difference contributes to a tremendous success for the company. When Jobs returned to Apple in 1997, the company was struggling to survive. Today it has more than $100 billion market capital and its products iMac, iPad and iPhone are reshaping the industry. Nevertheless, Apple also has several potential problems. Its secrecy tactic becomes especially risky when Jobs’ announcements do not live up to the lofty expectations. Besides, the music and film industries do not like Apple’s vertically integration, claiming that Apple has destroyed the music business. 

 

Question 2: What key theories have been illustrated in the case study? 

There are a number of theories in the discipline of management covered in this case. The first one is about leadership. According to Daft, Kendrick and Vershinina (2010), leadership refers to a process by which a person exerts influence over other people and inspires, motivates and directs their activities to help achieve group of organisational goals. Leadership is different from management because leaders normally have distinct qualities, and this is the core idea of trait theories of leadership. This approach attempts to define the traits, characteristics and skills which are needed for an outstanding leader. For example, Kirkpatrick and Locke (1991) identifies six traits to differentiate leaders from non-leaders, including ambition and energy, desire to lead, honesty and integrity, self-confidence, intelligence and job relevant knowledge. In this case, it is evident to see that Jobs enjoy many of these qualities. He is ambitious and energetic about business, and is also full of creativity. The reason why he can invent iPad and iPhone is largely due to its intelligence and job related knowledge. Besides trait theories, some scholars also developed the behavioural approaches based on Ohio State Studies and Michigan Studies. These studies helped form the modern approach to human resource management, which is employee focused rather than task focused. Furthermore, some models of leadership theories argue that leadership needs to be considered in the context of specific situations such as the organizational and environmental context where it is employed. They are called the contingency or situational theories of leadership. Finally, transformational leadership advocates that leaders should engage with followers to raise motivation and performance. With regard to Jobs, he is definitely a charismatic leader. Though he seems to be very autocratic and often demeans many people in public, employees are still motivated to work for Apple. Andy Hertzfeld, lead designer of the original Macintosh OS, says that ‘Jobs has the ability to pull the best out of people’. 

 

The second managerial theory is about organisational culture, which is defined as ‘the set of values, norms, standards of behaviour and common expectations which control the ways in which people interact with each other in the organisations and work to achieve organisations goals’ (Daft, Kendrick and Vershinina, 2010). These scholars divided organisational culture into three layers. The first one is values, which is a written down statement about company’s purpose, mission and objectives. The second layer is beliefs and it is more specific. The third one is the taken-for-granted assumptions. This is regarded as the real ‘core’ of culture since it is very difficult to identify and explain. Culture is an important source of control and has a significant impact on employees’ attitudes and behaviours. With regard to Apple, one of the most distinct culture features is secrecy.  For example, software and hardware designers are housed in separate buildings and kept from seeing each other’s work, so neither gets a complete sense of the project. In addition, employees are not allowed to tell their families about what they are working on. The company has benefited a lot from this kind of organisational culture as it attacks new product categories and grabs market share before competitors wake up. Furthermore, it also serves Apple’s marketing efforts very well, building up feverish anticipation for every announcement. Professor David Yoffie from Harvard Business School has said that the introduction of the iPhone resulted in headlines worth $400 million in advertising. 

 

Question 3: What problems can you identify within the case? What is the cause of these problems in your opinion?

Though Apple has achieved a great success, the company still faces some challenges. First of all, its secrecy tactic carries risks when company’s inventions do not live up to customers’ expectations. For instance, the MacBook Air computer received a mixed response because some fans were hoping for a touchscreen-enabled tablet PC and they thought the MacBook Air was insufficiently revolutionary. Secondly, not everyone likes Apple’s all-or-nothing approach, particularly those people in music and film industries, worrying that Jobs has become a gatekeeper for all digital content. Someone even claims that Apple has destroyed the music business. Meanwhile, this approach may also hurt its own customers. When Apple released its first upgrade to the iPhone operating system, it has a deadly problem of bricking or disabling many phones that contain unapproved applications. Finally, Jobs is too mean-spirited. As long as he is not happy or satisfied, he will humiliate his subordinates in public.

 

Question 4: What would you have done if you were given an opportunity to solve these problems?

What I will do is to conduct a survey among customers to see their preferences about the main invention direction of Apple’s next product. Thus, Apple is aware of whether customers prefer a touchscreen-enabled tablet PC or a MacBook Air. Yet the specific design and function of the product can be kept secret as usual. I remembered similar experiences when I was the President of Students’ Union in my undergraduate university. Each time we wanted to hold a campus level activity, we collected students’ opinions in advance. When the activity finished, we did the survey again to see the areas where can be further improved. Besides, if you have made a promise to customers, you must make sure that you can realize them. Otherwise customers will not trust you anymore.

 

Question 5: What have you personally learnt / developed reflecting back on the case?

I have learnt the importance of leader charisma and insistence. A good leader must insist what he or she believes is right, no matter it is how different from everyone else. I remember that once in a group work, the teacher asks us to choose a multinational company which aims to expand its business to a new market. The group mates suggested big companies like Wal-Mart and Starbucks but I thought they were not the best choice. First, it is very difficult to find an easy market that these companies have not entered. Second, other groups were very likely to choose these companies as well thereby it was harder for us to get a high mark. I had an answer in my heart that was Ryanair but I did not insist. The result of group work was not satisfied. If I have similar opportunities in the future, I will insist on my choice and persuade others to agree with me.

 

 

Case Two: Volkswagen

Question 1: What is the case study about? 

This case study is mainly about how Volkswagen’s former CEO and current chairman of executive supervisory board Perdinand Piëch manages the company. From the case study we can see that Mr Piëch is, knowledgeable brilliant and successful businessman who made the Volkswagen one of the most successful car makers throughout the world. His management style was very centralized, making every decision by himself and firing mangers who questioned his ideas or who did not follow his lead. Consequently, no middle managers can make decisions. Even he stepped down the position of CEO, his influence continued in the company. Therefore many people question whether the new CEO can really do his job. Besides the internal problem, Volkswagen also faces severe competition from Ford and other carmakers in Europe. In addition, high labour costs and low productivity at many of its plants also restrict its profitability.

 

Question 2: What key theories have been illustrated in the case study? 

The managerial theories about organisations have experienced a long evolution over time, from those classical perspective during 19th and late of 20th century, to the contingency view and total quality management (TQM) theories in 1970s, and finally to the most recent ones such as the learning organisation and the technology-driven workplace (Daft, Kendrick and Vershinina, 2010). First, the most famous representative of the classical perspectives is Taylor’s scientific management. Taylor focused on improving efficiency and labour productivity. In order to achieve this, managers needed to change and workers could be retooled like machines to match their skills and abilities with the needs of the tasks. The scientific management theory is very important because it laid down many of the key theories in management or HRM, showing the importance of compensation for performance as well as personnel selection and training. Nevertheless, it treated workers as the same machines so ignored the differences between them and the impact of the social context. The later humanistic perspective and contingency theory challenged this theory by either claiming the importance of understanding human behaviours, including their needs, attitudes and social interactions, or the need of resolving organizational problems in situations. Finally, the learning organization that was coined by Peter Senge emphasized on identifying and solving problems and growing the company in the process of learning.  Today the majority of companies have shifted to modern types of management, emphasizing on democracy and participation. However, Volkswagen is the exception. The company is still very centrally controlled using the administrative principles.

 

The case also mentioned about leadership. Daft, Kendrick and Vershinina (2010) define leadership as a process by which a person exerts influence over others and inspires, motivates and directs their activities to help achieve the goals of the organisations. Leadership and management have slight differences as leaders normally enjoy certain key qualities, and this is the core idea of trait theories of leadership. This approach attempts to define the traits, characteristics and skills that are needed for an outstanding leader. For instance, it is pointed out by Kirkpatrick and Locke (1991) that there are six traits differentiating leaders from others, they are ambition and energy, desire to lead, honesty and integrity, self-confidence, intelligence and job relevant knowledge. Moreover, some scholars also developed the behavioural approaches based on Ohio State Studies and Michigan Studies. These studies helped form the modern approach to human resource management, which is employee focused rather than task focused. Furthermore, some models of leadership theories argue that leadership needs to be considered in the context of specific situations such as the organizational and environmental context where it is employed. They are called the contingency or situational theories of leadership. Finally, transformational leadership advocates that leaders should engage with followers to raise motivation and performance. Ferdinand Piëch is definitely an authoritarian, who centralises power in his hand and makes every decision in the company. He is a do-it-myself leader, proposing new projects and engaging in deigns personally. On the other hand, he is also a successful leader, with distinct traits such as smart, energetic and decisive.

 

Question 3: What problems can you identify within the case? What is the cause of these problems in your opinion?

The most significant problem is that because Ferdinand Piëch almost made each important decision by himself, when he left middle managers could not make decisions. This kind of power centralization made the decision-making process extremely slow and lower-level managers may not be motivated to contribute. This problem is certainty resulted from Ferdinand Piëch’s authoritarian management, but also due to German corporate law which allows the chairman of the supervisory board to appoint management board members. Thus, Ferdinand Piëch still looked over the new CEO’s shoulder and his influence in the company continued. Secondly, Volkswagen faced renewed competition from Ford and other European carmakers. Its strategy to push into upscale vehicles proved to be not very successful and the existing sales hurted. Finally, the high labour costs and low productivity at many of Volkswagen’s plants made the company difficult to maintain a high level of productivity. Unfortunately the company can do little about the labour costs, and the low productivity may be due to company’s improper management or HRM strategies. 

 

Question 4: What would you have done if you were given an opportunity to solve these problems?

If I have the chance to solve these problems, what I will do first is to delegate power to middle and line managers because in some cases they are more familiar with the particular issues than the CEO. Thus, not-only the decision-making process will be quicker to response to new problems, but also their commitment and motivation increased. In addition, it is very important to have the successor ready when you step down. When I was nearly finishing the term as the President of Students’ Union, I started choosing my successor quite early and provided her many opportunities to show her abilities and power in the organisation. Thus when she officially became the President, she could quickly do her job. Then, I will move plants into developing countries to reduce some labour costs, and adapt strategic HRM policies to increase employee’s motivation and productivity.

 

Question 5: What have you personally learnt / developed reflecting back on the case?

On one hand, I have realized the importance of extensive knowledge of the industry towards a good leader. Only you have the enough knowledge and experience you can know the product and customer well and further fit them together. Besides the relevant knowledge and experience, again the leadership traits and skills are essential. I need to improve both of these sides in the future study and work. On the other hand, I have learnt how to balance power in the organisation. As a successful CEO or leader, you need to make tough decisions by yourself when there are different choices. But you also need to give your subordinates a certain level of power to let them help manage the company.

 

PART THREE: SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT

Over the semester I have learnt a lot about global business and management and my approach to critical perspectives in global management has changed significantly. Before this module I only use the geocentric attitude when considering those global issues, focusing on using the best approaches and people throughout the world to finish a specific job, regardless of the country of origin. The advantage of this approach is that it balances local and global objectives and has a deep understanding of global issues. However, this approach is very difficult to achieve. Hence, managers must have both local and global knowledge. Actually there are other three global perspectives. The first one is parochialism, viewing the world solely through people’s own eyes and perspectives. Because people do not recognize that other people have different ways of living and working, it creates a significant obstacle for global managers. The second approach is the ethnocentric attitude, arguing that the best work approaches and practices are those of the home country. Though this approach can result in tight control, its drawbacks include ineffective management, inflexibility and social and political backlash. Finally, the third perspective is the polycentric attitude, believing that host-country managers know the best work approaches and practices. Therefore, under this approach foreign employees often have the power to determine work practices. Besides, this attitude wins more support from host government committed local managers. On the other hand, the drawbacks are also evident, such as duplication of work, reduced efficiency and difficulty to maintain global objectives due to intense focus on local traditions. This helps me to think more comprehensively and critically when I doing my job. When considering a specific problem or issue, we cannot simply judge it by our previous experience or unilateral knowledge. We should think more comprehensively, trying to look at it using a different angle. Thus, we may find a new different way to solve problems.

 

The key learning points for this module include the four management functions, different perspectives about managerial theories, five approaches to structural design, organisational culture, leadership theories, business ethics and organisational change. When I draft the reflective journal, I went through each of the lecture notes as well as relevant chapters and readings. To be specific, when reviewing the Lecture 8 – Organisational Change, I first looked at the definition. Daft and Marcic (2008) defined this concept as the ‘adoption of a new idea or behaviour by an organisation’. The essential point of this lecture is the four types of strategic change, including adaption, reconstruction, evolution and revolution (Johnson and Scholes, 2002). For instance, adaption is the most common form of change and it normally occurs incrementally. The risk of adaption is that it may lead to strategic drift over time. Reconstruction involves rapid change and a great deal of upheaval within the organisation, yet it does not fundamentally change the existing corporate culture. It is more likely a turnaround situation for the company, representing a decline in corporation’s financial performance. Thirdly, evolution also requires a change of strategy, but here managers may realize the need for future transformational change. Consequently, it is likely to form a strategic approach of a ‘learning organisation’. Finally, revolution represents the most rapid strategic and cultural paradigm change, and often is the result of strategic drift over time or extreme external pressure such as the treat of takeover or new competition or changes in consumer taste or behaviour (Johnson and Scholes, 2002).

 

Among the learning materials of this module, the business ethics area particularly interests me because it is the area where we often ignored before. Besides, the numerous business scandals happened recently, such as Enron and worldwide banking crisis, reminding us the importance of business ethics. Nash (1990) defines the term as ‘the study of how personal moral norms apply to the activities and goals of commercial enterprise. It is not a separate moral standard, but the study of how the business context poses its own unique problems for the moral person who acts as an agent of the system’. There is another similar term – corporate social responsibility (CSR) – refers to the extent to which individual firms serve social needs other than those of the owners and managers even if this conflicts with the maximisation of profits (Morgan, 1997). The theory of CSR includes three perspectives. The first one is Friedman’s invisible hand approach. Friedman believes that a corporation is an artificial person therefore it has no moral obligation and responsibility. In addition, by pursuing his own interest, a corporation can promote the social benefits more effectively. The second approach is Galbraith’s government approach. Galbraith argues that it is the regulatory hand of the law and political process that deliver the benefits of economic activity to the common good. The final approach which is the stakeholder approach suggests that a corporation can and should have modified behaviour accordingly. Scholars who support this argument, for instance Chrysiddes and Kaler, claim that companies acting ethically will ultimately enjoy a long-term competitive advantage. In other words, ethical motives may often lead to profitable business results (Porter and Kramer, 2006; Windsor, 2006).

References

Chryssides, G and Kaler, J. (2000) An Introduction to Business Ethics. International Thomson Business Press, London.

 

Daft, R., Kendrick, M. and Vershinina, N. (2010) Management, Cengage Learning.

 

Johnson, G. and Scholes, K. (2002) Exploring Corporate Strategy. UK: Financial Times / Prentice Hall.

 

Kirkpatrick, S.A. and Locke, E.A. (1991), “Leadership: do traits really matter?”, Academy of Management Executive, Vol. 5 pp.48-60.

 

Nash, L.L. (1990) Good Intensions Aside: A Managers Guide to Resolve Ethical Problems. USA: Harvard Business School Press.

 

Porter, M. and Kramer, J. (2006) ‘Strategy and Society: The link between Competitive Advantage and Corporate Social Responsibility’, Harvard Business Review, December

 

Windsor, D. (2006) ‘Corporate Social Responsibility: Three Key Approaches’, Journal of Management Studies, 43(1)

 

 

原文链接:Critical Perspectives in Global Management