Methods to improve performance and customer satisfaction

 

Most of successful companies understand the powerful role of customer-satisfied quality can have on their business. For this reason a number of competitive companies continually improve their quality standards. For instance, both the Ford Motor Company and the Honda Motor Company announced that they are making customer satisfaction their number one priority. The slow economy of 2003 affected sales in this industry. Both companies believe that the approach to rebound is through higher quality standard, and each has pointed details to their operational management. Ford is attention to tightening standards in their production process and performance a program of quality called Six-Sigma. Honda, is concentrated on increasing customer-driven product design. Different companies have different interpretations of quality improvement which conduct various operational management.

 

Making quality a priority is mean focusing on customer satisfaction first, which exceeding and meeting quality expectations are defined by the customer called customer-defined quality. It meets customer expectations by including everyone in the group through an comprehensive effort. Total quality management (TQM) is an effort designed to improve quality at different level. Currently, there are various definitions of quality. Some people point quality as “performance to standards”. Others describe it as “satisfying the customer” or “meeting the customer’s needs”. TQM demonstrates that a perfectly product doesn’t have value if it is not satisfaction customer needs. For this reason, it can say that the standard of quality is customer-drivenHowever, tastes and preferences of customers are always changing that it is difficult to determine the customer needs, 

 

Continuously improvement which is called kaizen in Japanese, requires

that firms continually strive to do better through process learning and problem solving. On the position of companies can never achieve perfection level, thus companies always exam their operational performance and take measures to improve it. There is an approaches that can help firms with continuous improvement: the plan –do– study – act (PDSA) cycle.

 

The plan–do–study–act (PDSA) cycle can be described as activities a company needs to perform that incorporate continuous improvement in its operational management. This cycle, is also considered as the Shewhart cycle or the Deming wheel, which shows that continuous improvement is a never-ending process. Plan step is managers must estimate the ongoing process and give plans on the condition of any problems they find. They must be collecting data, demonstrating current procedures and then pinpointing problems. This information should then be specific measured to evaluate performance. Then the next step in the cycle is implementing the plan and managers should demonstrate all changes made and collect data for estimation. Study is the third step in the previous phase and the data are exam to see whether the plan is match the goals set in the planning step. The final phase is to perform on the above results of the first three phases. This is a cycle; the next step is to start plan again. After we have performance, we need to continue evaluating the process, planning, and repeating the cycle again.

 

The quality improvement approach is a system of management: open to the market, strategic in nature, cyclical in operation (producing goods and investigating feedback), holding for equilibrium (a position of balance between opposing or divergent impacts or elements), and finding optimization (an approach of arranging and combining the influence of all elements so as to achieve requirements). As a result that all of these improvement approaches in order to have more market share which is focusing on customer satisfaction. It is the truth of improve performance of companies in competitive markets.

 

 

Reference:

Goetsch, David L., and Stanley Davis. Implementing Total Quality. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1995.

 

Hall, Robert. Attaining Manufacturing Excellence. Burr Ridge, Ill.:Dow-Jones Irwin, 1987.

 

Juran, Joseph M. “The Quality Trilogy,” Quality Progress 10, no.8(1986), 19–24.

 

Juran, Joseph M. Quality Control Handbook. 4th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1988.

 

Juran, Joseph M. Juran on Planning for Quality. New York: Free Press, 1988.

 

Journal of Operations and Production Management, 20, no. 2, 2000, 225–248